Post 5: Description Post

Source:  Post 5: Description Post    Tag:  inactivated poliovirus
Upon being born a baby is given a shot within the first hours of its life. This shot will be the first of many to immunize the baby from harmful diseases. This particular shot is the hepatitis B vaccine, and it is given to the infant before it leaves the hospital, usually within the first two days of its life.

A month or 2 after birth, the baby is given another hepatitis B vaccine. Usually at that same appointment the rotavirus vaccine is given as well as the diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis vaccine, also so is haemophilus influenza type b, pneumococcal vaccine, and the inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

From there the baby is given another round of rotavirus vaccine, diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis vaccine, haemophilus influenza type b, pneumococcal vaccine, and the inactivated poliovirus vaccine are supposed to be given at 4 months of age.

6 months after birth, the hepatitis b vaccine is given again. As well as rotavirus vaccine, diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis vaccine, haemophilus influenza type b, pneumococcal vaccine, and the inactivated poliovirus vaccine. The influenza vaccine is given for the first time at this age.

At 1 year of age it is recommended that these vaccines be given from 12 months to about 18 months the hepatitis b, diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis vaccine, haemophilus influenza type b, pneumococcal vaccine, the inactivated poliovirus vaccine, influenza vaccine, as well as the new shots of measles, mumps, and rubella, varicella, and the hepatitis a vaccines.

19-23 months old the yearly influenza vaccine as well as the hepatitis a vaccine are given.

At 2-3 years of age the pneumococcal, hepatitis a, and meningococcal vaccines are given.

Finally at 4-6 years of age the diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis vaccines are given. Also pneumococcal vaccine, inactivated poliovirus vaccine, yearly influenza vaccine, mmr vaccine, varicella vaccine, hepatitis a vaccine, and the meningococcal vaccines are all given.

With this recommended schedule of vaccine injections, it seems that the immune system overload theory might have some weight behind it. Kids these days are recommended to get all these shots before the age of 6, and I don't disagree with that, but maybe spacing the shots out would help lower autism rates. Somethings gotta give, because with the increasing rates of autism every year, we are going to get to the point where the American public says "enough is enough", and demand better guidelines and procedures for giving vaccines, as well as recommending that parents space the shots out.